Sessions

To maintain momentum, higher ed capital planning processes must now evolve as institutions seek to grow, diversify, and adopt increasingly complex funding models. Tobi Walsh illustrates the changes that George Mason University has implemented to its planning processes in response to changes in program drivers and funding streams, and to align with long-term institutional priorities. She examines the development of a comprehensive space planning framework to coalesce unit-level space plans into a cohesive, responsive long-term space needs forecast. She highlights near-term actions that institutions should take now, including strategically preparing projects to save on escalation as funding becomes available.

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Arizona Ballroom

The acquistion of an old AT&T call center will expand the UIW campus and academic space by more than 15%. But success depends on selecting the right project team, allocating and designing the right space for multiple stakeholder groups, and identifying the right strategies to manage cost while preserving key elements of a historic building. Darrell Haydon shares the decision making procsss when considering a historic building acquisition, and the unique criteria that was used to select the architect and general contractor. He illustrates the design process used for academic and administrative space for a building that will house an international center and two colleges, and the results - fully interactive high-flex academic spaces, an open and welcoming environment for students, and comfortable and flexible administrative spaces.

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Arizona Ballroom

With the future of campus space use still coming into focus, attractive and flexible space supporting a wide variety of programs will be critical to institutional success. Joslyn Gray profiles Stanford University’s Denning House, a unique facility that engenders collaboration, learning, and hugs (consensual, of course!) Denning House is ultra-flexible, accommodating numerous academic and social activities from start-up ideas festivals, dining etiquette lessons, improv classes, study space, and more. Joslyn illustrates how that level of flexibility was achieved, design criteria for social hubs, communal space, and campus “destination” space, and what’s been provided to support discovery, creativity, team building, and entrepreneurship.

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Arizona Ballroom

Arizona State University’s 40-classroom Durham Hall renovation/modernization is case study in adapting 1960’s era buildings for the new academic workplace: technology-rich, natural light-filled, flexible, and collaborative. Kelly Malloy Petty and Patricia Marquez examine budgeting and stakeholder engagement strategies for a workhorse building that ensure key project deliverables are met, manage cost escalation, and enable additional scope options. They illustrate design decisions to meet demand and occupancy levels and provide enhanced spaces that align with program requirements and anticipate future building occupants, and identify key considerations for phased renovations that minimize downtime and disruption.

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Arizona Ballroom

Florida International University continues to evolve its active learning medical education classroom model based on lessons learned, and the latest iteration illustrates a required change of thinking related to infrastructure, utilization, budget, and coordination with state fire marshal, vendors, and media services departments. Jose Rodriquez charts generational changes to active learning environments, and sets out the latest wisdom on furniture, dimmable lighting, cluster designs, power/data/microphone, sightlines to displays, acoustics and sound masking. He relays how faculty have been leveraging the new environments, and what they are saying which may inform future designs.

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Arizona Ballroom

A plethora of outdated buildings on your campus can provide the new space required for expanding diverse academic programs. In this session, Amy Kirtland and Jan Becker explore the shared space opportunities and methods used to back fill 71,000 sf of an outdated building through phased renovations. They illustrate how the renovations have addressed campus programmatic needs, reduced deferred maintenance, and improved the building’s FCI (Facility Condition Index) rating with new building systems. They detail the shared space models that have created an academic hub with programs from engineering and applied science to the school of education

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Arizona Ballroom

A post-pandemic enrollment wave is overwhelming campus residential inventories and creating competitiveness concerns, and many institutions have no space, time, or budget to build new. To deliver just-in-time housing and provide enrollment fluctuation flexibility for the future, Hope College has taken to using neighborhood houses for student housing, and here you’ll get the pros and cons and lessons learned from that approach. Kara Slater scopes out the investment strategy, stakeholder engagement models (local government, neighborhood, operations, and students), and the student response to the model of "housing that grows with you." 

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Arizona Ballroom

This end-of-day session is where key ideas, new developments, and findings that have been revealed over the course of the entire two-day conference (including sessions you may have missed) get clarified, expanded upon, and affirmed or debated. This is also the opportunity to get answers from industry leaders and the entire audience to specific questions on key and challenging issues.  

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Vaquero Ballroom

From neutral air distribution to façade optimization, this presentation explores the planning and design process of University of Michigan's Kinesiology Building, an adaptive reuse of a century-old, Albert Kahn-designed landmark on the Ann Arbor campus. Session leaders detail the adaptation of non-science spaces to laboratory work through skillful interventions in the architectural and engineering systems. They illustrate strategies for integrating new mechanical and utility systems strategies into older architecture, and the results: For the university, a new, dynamic home for the ever-expanding School of Kinesiology with reduced embodied and operational carbon.

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Through curated research and student involvement, legacy campus facilities can serve as budget-friendly building blocks for future-facing capital initiatives aimed at student engagement. That’s the takeaway message from UW-Milwaukee’s Student Union transformation, and in this session presenters illustrate how student values and DEAI goals were incorporated into the design to create a sense of belonging and community. They detail renovation and revitalization solutions which maximize the impact of available budgets, and deliver safety, wellness, belonging, and support for diverse informal learning. They also outline how to develop holistic pre- and post-occupancy evaluations and evaluate the results. 

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Collegiate athletic and academic leadership are taking a long hard look at what drives the decisions of their stakeholders beyond just the paycheck or the degree. How does an employee and student experience in your facility factor into the bigger picture of workplace wellness, satisfaction, retention, and engagement? John Roberson challenges session participants to consider “What story is your facility telling the people who are most valuable to your brand?” He guides the group through a step-by-step experience design exercise on how to tell your brand's story in your space in a way that moves your donors, students, and faculty that evokes them to action, creating an emotional connection with your organization.
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The new Center for Academic Medicine at Stanford sets new benchmarks for space use, program productivity, and healthy work environments. Presenters examine interactive and proactive programming, planning and design processes that generate highly efficient decision making in the concept stages, accelerate design time, and create vision-enabling work environments. They deliver key details for the academic open workplace, offices, research environments, community space, collaboration areas, supplemental education spaces, café and a variety of other amenities engaging campus users. They demonstrate an analytical phenotyping process that identifies specific user needs and defines levels of future flexibility for evolving uses demographics and amenities over time.

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Breakthroughs happen when disciplines come together around a common theme. To propel the future of science, Carnegie Mellon University identified a campus gateway site to bring together students, faculty, staff, and partners to work together on life science breakthroughs, the materials of the future, sustainability science, computational biology, and machine learning. Presenters set out programming and design strategies for this unique facility which leverages an off-site “Cloud Lab” for automated research, includes a Center for Contemporary Art, and provides a diverse set of classrooms, study spaces, and amenities to create even more intersections and interactions.

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Mounting pressure on construction costs will impact all higher education facility projects on the drawing boards, both new construction and renovations. Attend this session to get better pricing and more accurate budget figures for cost escalation in the post-pandemic economy, and better understand construction cost drivers for different academic programs. Session leaders deliver up-to-date construction cost forecasts based on employment data, spending trends, commodity prices, and cost data from more than 100 projects. Using analyses of equities, GDP, and construction labor markets, they illustrate regional construction pricing targets for the next two years and demonstrate bid and purchasing strategies that lock in costs and reduce risk.

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Planning new research space prior to building users being identified is a challenge faced by many institutions, and in this session you’ll see solutions adopted by University of Cincinnati and Carnegie Mellon to support innovative work styles and contextualized approaches to researcher collaboration. Session leaders compare design strategies that catalyze out-of-lab collaboration, attract and retain researchers, and maximize flexibility, anticipating future users and research disciplines that aren't known yet. They examine key success factors for both on-campus and off-campus models.

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As university campuses return to pre-pandemic steady-state, uncertainties remain when planning for a hybrid future. In this session, Jay Deshmukh explores the results of the IBI THiNK study which conducted over 200 detailed interviews with faculty, students, and facility managers at 125+ campuses around the world from April 2020 - December 2022 to gain insights into teaching and learning spaces, hybrid learning, and campus planning. She presents ten key planning and design takeaways and identifies what to anticipate for space allocation and space utilization, types of new spaces that will be needed, and those that are likely to be discarded.

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A total of 350 donors and philanthropists gave to the development of the Werner and Colleen Nister College of Business & Public Administrations – but the contributions did not end there. The philanthropists and donors were invited to collaborate on the design of their space, focusing on the impact of bridging education with real-world business experience. Here, session leaders demonstrate how a university, a community, a state, and alumni came together to create the forward-thinking, world-class 124,000-square-foot Nistler Hall that features versatile classrooms with synchronous learning, new technology and furniture, over 20 break-out rooms, and study nooks located at every possible opportunity.

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The role of the college and university library has changed remarkably, and new paradigms are emerging that increase utilization and augment learning spaces on campus even further. In this session, Dr. Joan Bush and June Hanley demonstrate how the Community College of Philadelphia library has taken on very different post-pandemic use by the students, and they illustrate how institutional leadership has embedded new features and designs for active, collaborative, and focused learning. They examine the new thinking about book stacks, various types of learning and study space, library staff space, and stations for information seeking, finding, and evaluation. 

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What never-before-considered space use opportunities are now on the table, leveraging hybrid environments to meet pressing higher ed mission needs of education, collaboration, improved space utilization, and cost reduction? Laura Serebin and Elizabeth Strutz explore the results of three recent studies at higher education institutions, including qualitative and quantitative data from teaching faculty and students on the effectiveness of current space types for supporting hybrid education in the future. They identify key considerations, new best practices, and metrics to inform and equip space planners for creating high performing, flexible spaces that meet the needs of faculty, staff and students.

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New academic priorities and hard state funding limitations are challenging university planners across North America to do more with less funding. In this session, presenters call upon a case study of the new School of Public Policy at the University of Maryland to illustrate new design strategies that improve space utilization, increase flexibility, and reduce cost through multi-purposed facility resources, communal space, and innovative learning and office environments. They examine the outcome and how it has become a destination weaving together far-flung campus stakeholders and competing priorities through a mix of ancient and modern design strategies.

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The new Central Campus Classroom Building and Alexander Ruthven Renovation at University of Michigan is solving a common three-fold problem: 1) lack of large-format instructional space, 2) how to reimagine and repurpose an obsolete historic structure, and 3) disconnected leadership and administration. Presenters examine how adaptive reuse capital projects can address the post-pandemic challenge of building enthusiasm and reconnecting administration, trustees and leadership with faculty and students, while comingling diverse programs, people, and resources in a collaborative academic workplace. They highlight decisions on innovative, flexible, and agile learning settings for evolving pedagogies, and the results.

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The pandemic has profoundly changed the utilization and allocation of permanent office spaces, which already account for the largest non-residential space on campus. With a large population of staff working flexibly, and significant numbers of faculty offices with low levels of utilization, free address strategies can free up real estate to be reimagined, sold, subleased, or demolished. Presenters deliver strategies to introduce and implement free address models including establishing appropriate ratios (seats, people, meeting rooms); leveraging scheduling systems; fostering a welcoming atmosphere; managing personal and team storage (and clutter); and mitigating noise and disruption. Case studies profile universities that successfully implemented unassigned seating models, lessons learned, and results achieved.

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